Blog : social media

The Problem With Digital Content

The Problem With Digital Content

This article was first published on Stoppress.co.nz in April 2016.

“Content is king” has widely been proclaimed by marketing folks for decades

Today, it’s a message that continues to be embraced wholeheartedly by marketers.

Five exabytes of content were created between the birth of the world and 2003. In 2014, five exabytes of content were created each day.

Yet, despite this outpouring, content is not working.

In 2015, Moz and Buzzsumo analysed a million posts to understand the correlation between different types of content, and discovered that 85 percent of online content is redundant.

Think of the time, effort and money that went into that 85 percent. Think of what could have been, had it been invested elsewhere. Think of the 59 percent of marketers who will increase spend on redundant content in 2016.

Something is broken. There’s just too much content.

(Before we go further, let me state I’m fully aware of the hypocrisy of writing a piece about content that is, by definition, a piece of content. But digital is nothing if not meta, so it can’t be helped.)

Orwell feared the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance.

It looks like Huxley will be right.

The deluge of content is so great, there’s a modern condition named for it – ‘Content Shock‘.

Brands are advised to post to Twitter anywhere from 10-30 times per day. The Huffington Postpublishes 1,200 pieces of content a day. Coca-Cola spends more on content than on television advertising. 130,000 articles are published every week on LinkedIn. It’s expensive to create, it’s hard to filter, it’s impossible to consume.

To cut through the noise, a reductionist approach has been adopted. The current advice for reaching a large audience on LinkedIn is to write about one of five categories. Since when did the entire population of global professionals decide they were only interested in five things? That’s 130,000 posts a week, largely on the same five topics.

It’s Groundhog Day with hashtags, content for content’s sake.

So far, so much complaining. Am I calling for the end of content creation? No, but I am calling for a focus not on content, but on quality and purpose.

It’s not possible to create content at his volume and scale and retain a degree of quality. Mark Duffy (aka Copyranter) recently wrote on the linguistic gymnastics employed to define and justify the content assault. Xero’s CMO has described content marketing as ‘garbage’, and it aptly describes much of what has been produced in its name.

Ad blocking is an industry headache, but the real issue is quality. Use of ad blockers is simply an indicator of consumer dissatisfaction with digital content. Who can blame them, when a recent survey stated that 70 percent of brands produce poor quality content when judged against challenging criteria like, you know, being easy to read.

The decline in quality is symptomatic of a decline in purpose, of misunderstanding what content is actually for, combined with a self-imposed pressure to churn out content multiple times a day.

This has been driven, in part, by this absurd notion that every brand in digital is now a ‘storyteller’. Yet the majority of consumers, even those who liked your page or feed, have little interest in your brand story. Give them something genuinely useful, and maybe, just maybe, they’ll stick around for a moment. But your story? Who cares!

Consumers don’t have time to pay attention. They want content that addresses their intent, solves a problem or meets a need, in that moment, on that device. It all comes back to a clear strategy and the customer experience – content with purpose, acting in the context of a larger journey, moving customers from A to B.

There’s an obvious business rationale here too. Great content requires an investment, if not in its creation, then at least in its promotion. But if your content achieves no measurable result, if it’s part of the 85%, then it’s a waste of money. Is your content solving problems? Are you measuring its performance beyond tactical outputs, beyond clicks and likes and shares? Is it actually changing anything?

That’s the key. Less is more and purpose is king. Be original. Don’t write another listicle. Quality trumps quantity every time. Ignore everything you’ve ever read about how often you ‘should’ post. If you must create content, do so because, as brand or human, you have something truly, genuinely, purposeful to say.

The king is dead. Long live the king.

The Slow Death of Twitter

The Slow Death of Twitter

I’ve been a fan of Twitter for a long time. But sadly, the platform is no longer what it was. It has become a massive echo chamber of competing voices and no way to adequately sort the wheat from the chaff. Some argue that it’s getting back on track, and I hope it does, but I’m yet to be convinced. Until then, this cartoon by Brad Colbow does a beautiful job illustrating the slow death of a once great social media platform.

(credit: BradColbow.comtheguardian.com)

Death of Twitter

What Dan Bilzerian can teach your brand about social media

What Dan Bilzerian can teach your brand about social media

Guns and women. That’s the recipe for success in social media. At least in the world of Dan Bilzerian.

Dan who?

Dan Bilzerian (NSFW). The ‘King of Instagram’. 12.7 million followers. Poker player, beard exponent and all round playboy.

Bilzerian is controversial. His feed is full of conspicuous displays of consumption, bikini models, guns and a cat called Smushball.

Some love him, some hate him. And I’m not going to get into the morals of his content here. Regardless of your opinion, he’s managed to parlay his approach into a social media empire, cameos in Hollywood films and a virtual lifestyle the envy of 20-something males the world over.

So what can brands possibly learn about social content from this guy? Here’s the top 10:

  1. He understands what his audience wants and he gives it to them. He’s living the dream (well, someone’s dream) and taking his audience along for the ride.
  2. He’s prolific, posting often. Fans can expect regular updates.
  3. He plays to the strengths of the channel. Instagram has rules about nudity which he pushes to the limit, plus he uses video, slo-mo and tagging to great effect.
  4. He invests in the content, often using dedicated camera crews, drones and other means to capture moments in interesting ways.
  5. He has a distinct tone of voice. Plenty of humour and a definite attitude.
  6. It’s personal. There’s no filter here. No doubt there’s curation and some careful stage management, but no filter.
  7. The content is shareable. Again, he knows what his audience wants, and they pass it on in spades.
  8. He mixes it up. It’s not all guns and bikinis (though mostly). He posts about supporting veterans, his cat – there’s just enough humanity in there to take the edge off the debauchery. Otherwise it would get old pretty quickly.
  9. He syndicates. The people tagged in his posts begin to develop communities of their own off the back of its popularity. This begins to create an infinite loop, with him at the centre.
  10. It all works to build the brand. Everything is done to cultivate a mystique about this ridiculous lifestyle. Nothing goes up that detracts from this.

Sure, he’s an odd case study for social media, and I’m definitely not saying your brand should go out and copy his content. But it’s important to note that the approach, the principles, are universal, and fundamental to creating successful social media content, no matter what your business.

Dan Bilzerian is simply proof that putting them into practice works.

Why your digital experience is losing you customers

Why your digital experience is losing you customers

Do you want to lose customers? Give them a poor digital experience.

According to a recent Australian study, 43% of consumers were unsatisfied with the digital experience offered by the country’s largest organisations. Of those, only 17% would remain loyal to the brand.

On the flipside, 73% of consumers who enjoyed a strong digital experience would remain loyal to the brand.

These statistics are compelling. And if there’s ever been a more urgent reason to invest in the digital experience, I’d like to see it.

What is a ‘digital experience’?

A digital experience (DX) is the sum of all interactions a customer has with a company across its digital properties. This includes web, social, mobile, ecommerce, eDMs, marketing, digital in-store…the list goes on.

In our age of ‘always-on’ connectivity, customer expectations are changing rapidly, becoming ever more demanding. And as the statistics show, there’s very little forgiveness for brands who don’t measure up. I’d like to say that new technologies have made the experience easier to create, but the proliferation of mobile, social media, Internet of Things (IoT) etc have made life increasingly difficult.

Digital interactions will continue to become more complex and interactive. Enterprises now manage an average of 268 customer-facing websites, and that’s before getting into any other channels, content etc. In other words, the digital experience can appear to be a complicated beast. But it doesn’t have to be…

How to create a digital experience strategy

Some will argue that you can’t create a digital experience, you can only influence it. In a literal sense, this may be true, though it strays into semantics. You can essentially ‘create’ the experience in your owned channels, such as your website, though with ‘rented’ social channels or elsewhere, you’re bound by what they give you.

Regardless, a great digital experience is driven by customer needs, and should have the goal of at least meeting, and ideally, exceeding, them.

Keep these key principles in mind to create a DX strategy that won’t lose you customers:

  • Put the customer front and centre. Digital experiences are ultimately about people, not IT, technology or anything else.
  • Be personal. Customers want experiences that are relevant and tailored to them.
  • Less is more. A simplified digital experience tends to equal an improved digital experience. This applies both to the customer and ability to manage it internally.
  • Start at the end and work backwards. Understand what the final result should be and create the pathway from there.
  • Be mobile-friendly. We’re talking responsive web design, adaptive content etc. It depends on your demographic, but a majority of customers will likely start here.
  • Draw the ecosystem. I’m a big fan of visual thinking. Map out the desired experience – it will become far easier to understand.
  • Context is key. Your channels and content need to be relevant and accessible to the consumer, anytime, anywhere.

Simple, right?!

I won’t lie, a good DX strategy requires work and investment, but to ensure the loyalty of at least 73% of your customers, that has to be a price worth paying.

To talk about how we can help with a digital experience strategy for your business, contact us today.

Social media strategy in six steps

Social media strategy in six steps

A common mistake made by businesses is leaping into social media without a clear plan. Creating a strategy doesn’t need to be complicated. It’s simply about asking the right questions at the right times.

Our six step process – Define, Listen, Plan, Create, Engage, Measure – breaks down those questions into specific stages. This makes planning far more manageable. It also ensures you have the necessary answers before moving on to the next stage.

When we create a social media strategy, it’s typically based on this process. However, the plan and final result is far more comprehensive. We hope it’s a useful addition to your social media resources. If you have any questions, please leave a comment!

Six steps to a social media strategy
Six steps to a social media strategy